Tag Archives: Patent Strategy

Using patents to create business value

Failure to Generate REAL Patent Protection: Keurig’s Story (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this “Failure to Create REAL Patent Value: Keurig’s Story,” I asserted that the company’s current business woes can be directly attributable to a flawed patent strategy. To summarize, as a result of the Keurig Green Mountain’s failure to obtain durable patent rights on its coffee pods, there has been a proliferation… Read More »

Failure to Generate REAL Patent Protection: Keurig’s Story (Part 1)

Innovators–be they individuals or corporations–frequently view patent protection as the key to capturing value from the time and money invested in creating a successful product. Indeed, conventional wisdom dictates that a patent covering a true innovation will make it difficult, if not virtually impossible, for a competitor to legally provide a knock-off product to the… Read More »

How Startup Patent Filing is Different

The prevailing view of patent experts who advise innovators–be they individuals or companies–it that patent filings should occur as early as possible. This advice, which is even more prevalent now that the US has moved to a “first to file” system, exacerbates the significant problem of worthless patents that I have written about previously. To… Read More »

The Medical Device Patent Strategy Problem-Case Study

An IP Strategist like myself spends considerable time “Monday Morning Quarterbacking” patent strategy for medical devices and other inventions for the purposes of valuation, commercialization and otherwise. In this regard, I am frequently asked to review medical device patents to provide my opinion regarding claim coverage in relation to commercialization potential. Most of these reviews… Read More »

Patent Early? Maybe Not

Patent lawyers almost always instruct inventors to file for patent protection at the earliest possible date, but maybe this is not the best advice for many startups. To the contrary, I think this conventional advice is flawed–at least when it applies to inventions involving unproven products with no known customer base. Put simply, unless customers… Read More »

Who Needs a Patent?

My response to the question posed in the title of this post is typically: “the only person who needs a patent is a patent attorney.” Indeed, if a patent attorney fails to convince clients like you that they need to obtain a patent, she will quickly lose her livelihood. You should therefore be skeptical if a patent… Read More »

Strategic Patenting: How To Get it Right (Guest Post)

This article, by Francis Hagel, first appeared in Intellectual Property Magazine. It provides strong guidance, in checklist form, for those seeking to beat the odds that the patents they obtain will actually generate strategic value. Mr. Hagel is an IP strategy advisor from France. The article is reproduced with permission. “Suggestions for strategic drafting of… Read More »

Strategic Patenting 4: A Case Study of Success

The Takeaway:  In the 4th post in this Strategic Patenting Series, a case study is presented of a company that created durable market-making patent protection for a successful consumer product innovation using a disciplined patenting strategy. The strategic patenting efforts of Procter & Gamble undertook with its market-leading Swiffer Wet Jet® floor cleaning system allowed… Read More »

Strategic Patenting Part 3: Why (Almost) Every Innovator Fails to Maximize Patent Value

The Take Away:  Those seeking to generate market-making patent coverage for new innovations must recognize that patent coverage should focus not on how the problem is solved but instead on the benefits provided to the customer.  Most patent coverage is directed to a specific solution to a customer need that is characterized in the form… Read More »

Strategic Patenting Part 1: Why So Few Patents Create Real Value

Many business people are surprised to find out that all patents are not created equal.  A recent study of Fortune 500 companies reported in Suzanne Harrison’s Edison in the Boardroom Revisited indicates that only a very small number of patents–namely, 5%– obtained by these top patent filers created strategic value for their owners.  If only 5% of… Read More »