Innovation Professionals–Take Charge of Patents to Ensure ROI of Your Efforts (includes a case study)

Recently, I have been spending considerable time working with innovation professionals to demonstrate the value-creation opportunities available by embracing IP strategy as an aspect of their processes, and why patent drafting should be an aspect of their roles and responsibilities.  More specifically, my efforts have focused on why and how patents matter to the ROI of corporate innovation today.  Most business people would likely acknowledge that patents are important to protect their products from competition, however, the vast majority of the innovation professionals whom I meet have no idea how critical patent strategy can be to the success of their business plans. Modern innovation processes typically start with identification of a consumer need or the like.  In so doing, the innovation team undertakes detailed research to draw dimension around a product that will solve this consumer need.  This research will be directed toward identifying the multiple ways the consumer need can be addressed.  For a number of reasons–some of which will be related to specific competencies of the company–only one of these ways will be selected as the go-to-market product strategy.  By the time the product is fleshed out, these myriad alternative ways to solve the consumer need will be Continue Reading →

Checklists Could be the Key for Managers to Understand Whether Their Company’s Patents are Worth the Paper They’re Written On

My friend Mary Adams of the Smarter Companies blog posted a brief article about Atul Gawande’s recent book The Checklist Manifesto. I agree with Mary that checklists can be a powerful way to improve the work product quality of experts, and wanted to expand on her discussion as they relate to intellectual property, in particular patents.  Also, I think that corporate managers who rely on the expertise of their company’s patent lawyers can gain insights into the quality of their team’s work product, even when they do not themselves seemingly hold the requisite skills to make such assessments just by starting a conversation about checklists. MY CHECKLIST STORY I read Dr. Gawande’s original New Yorker article that formed the basis for the book at the same time I a good friend of mine–with whom I practiced law at a prestigious IP boutique–lost her corporate job in about December 2007.  While there were many reasons why she was let go, the growing economic crisis and her high salary being  major factors, my friend was open to the fact that the head of the patent department and she clashed repeatedly about about her view that the patent group needed to establish processes Continue Reading →